Paul Cezanne “Riverbank” Day 2

My routine of posting a new blog on a Wednesday following a Tuesday copiest session at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. was derailed by an ice storm which hit our area hard leaving behind a half inch of ice on top of snow with down trees, limbs, power lines and a host of other problems.  Our power was off for two days forcing me to flee to a warmer shelter and unable to do any work related to art or blog.  We’re just getting back to normal.  Like everyone else feeling the effects of this winter, I’m hoping for better days ahead.

Tuesday, February 4, was day two working with Paul Cezanne’s “Riverbank”.  As one can see from the photo, while it is barely beginning to hum, as my favorite museum guard often says, it is coming along nicely.

Nature was the foundation and inspiration for Cezanne’s art.  He painted with feeling and his own strong emotion.  He had a personal, independent perception of the world which was formed by studying the great masters but always aspiring towards the intense and artless vision of a child.  He searched for his own temperament.  Cezanne asserted that art must strive to be ‘equivalent’ to nature and painted with a series of marks, colors and tones on a canvas that was the realization of his sensations.  As I copy “Riverbank”, my task is to figure out how those marks were made and the meaning behind them.  I discover as I work that Cezanne observed every nuance of light and tone in nature and every time the light changed, he would interpret that light with a different color layered thinly one on top of the other in a very determined fashion.  Copying “Riverbank” requires close observation and much thought and study.

The Gallery has several new and exciting exhibitions.  Let it warm your days viewing beautiful works of art and if you visit on a Tuesday, don’t forget to stop by to see me in gallery #84.  It looks as if I’ll be there for a while before going on to my next copy.

New Exhibit at the Delaplaine

The Frederick County Art Association will open its Member Exhibit with a reception this Saturday, January 4th from 3 to 5 pm at the Delaplaine Visual Arts Center, 40 S. Carroll Street in Frederick, Maryland.  I have entered two works into the exhibit, “Young Dancer” and “Bridge at Argenteuil” after Monet.  I hope to see many of my friends and family at the reception.  It is also First Saturday in downtown Frederick which offers many activities to be enjoyed all over town, not to mention great restaurants and shopping.  So bundle up, come out and enjoy the town as well as great art during the opening of several new exhibits at the Delaplaine.

Young Dancer
Young Dancer
The Bridge at Argenteuil after Claude Monet
The Bridge at Argenteuil after Claude Monet

On Tuesday, January 7th I will be putting the finishing touches on my copy of Vincent van Gogh “Roses” at the National Gallery of Art.  I’m also very excited to see for the first time the NGA’s newest acquisition of van Gogh’s painting “Green Wheat Fields, Auvers,” which has not been seen publicly since 1966 and was painted months before the artist’s death in 1890.  It hangs right next to “Roses” in gallery #83 so I will be able to admire it all day long.

On Tuesday, January 21st I will begin work on Paul Cezanne’s “Landscape near Paris” in the Impressionist gallery.  This masterpiece is a bit different from the ones I’ve previously copied.  It is a very loose oil painting done in thin washes almost like a watercolor. It will be a new challenge for me.  I will keep you posted on the progress.

Vincent van Gogh Roses in Pink

Painting at the NGAMany may not realize that Vincent van Gogh created several versions of “Roses”.   The masterpiece created by VanGogh, “Roses” that is in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. was painted in 1890, shortly before he was released from the asylum at Saint-Remy.  It is among his largest and most beautiful still lifes, with an exuberant bouquet in the glory of full bloom.

Originally, the roses were pink which would have made a beautiful compliment with the green background.  However, the pink has faded throughout the years.  It is difficult to determine which roses and how many were originally pink. I am in the process of copying this piece for the second time.  The first time I copied it just as the it looks today.  For the second try, after doing some research, I took the liberty of painting it in the manner that I believe van Gogh created the original–with the pink roses.  After careful observation, I decided that the flowers that have the slightest tinge of pink were probably the ones that he painted in pink. It’s been fun to see how this painting has evolved and how it will end up.  It should be completed in about one more session.

One can view the original creation as well as my copy on Tuesdays from 10:30 AM until about 4:00 PM in the Impressionist Gallery #83.

Girl with a Watering Can

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was one of the most beloved and talented of the Impressionist artists.  His works, especially in his early period, are noted for their soft edges and brilliant colors.  On Tuesday, November 13, I will complete my first Renoir copy.  The Girl With a Watering Can depicts a young girl, dressed in brilliant blue, and clutching her watering can while in the garden.  This painting draws a crowd every day.  Young and old, her pleasant smile captivates them all and ranks as one of Renoir’s true masterpieces.  Interest in the copy has been high with several people stating they would like a Renoir in their home.

The copy is 36″ by 26″ available for sale, certified as an authentic copy of the original brilliant masterpiece at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.  Painting the copy has been a joy.  I can’t count the number of photos that have been taken while working on this icon in Renoir’s life.  The young girls smile is so sweet you want to hug the painting.  Several people have remarked they look at the painting and get the feeling they would like to jump into the painting so they could walk with this beautiful young lady.  Interested?  Contact me at sgadra@me.com.