Paul Cezanne “Riverbank” Day 3

A difference that is immediately noticed in the above photo is the color.  “Riverbank” was painted in 1895.  One of the most asked questions from visitors while I’m painting  regards the noticeable differences in colors.  Am I purposely changing the color of my copy?  The answer is no.  The differences are traced to the age of the original painting.  Time, atmosphere, dust, and climate have faded and discolored many of the original works.  I often wonder if the original painting as it was painted looked more like my copy  in both color and brightness.   Eventually, my intention is to tweak and tone down the colors with a glaze to make them look more like the original.  However, in some cases, visitors or a client might like the brighter, more colorful look.  I may choose to stay somewhere in between.

Although Cezanne has always been considered an Impressionist and his masterpieces hang in the Impressionism gallery at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., his association with Impressionism was a brief and unsatisfactory one, a marriage of convenience rather than a true affair of the heart.  Initially, he welcomed the opportunity to exhibit his paintings in the company of some of the impressionists he respected, namely Pissarro, Renoir and Monet.  Cezanne was a ‘high strung’ individual, and often experienced dark depressions and irrational outbursts of anger with even his most loyal friends.  He eventually disassociated himself from the impressionists.  The weather seemed to affect his moods often having to deal with long periods of rain and dreariness which prevented him from going outdoors to do what he loved best, paint the light.

Regarding the weather, I imagine many of us are feeling like Cezanne with the winter of our discontent this year.  We have barely recovered from the last snow and ice storm and must now prepare for an even larger amount of the white stuff.  We’re expecting up to  14″ of snow tonight and strong winds tomorrow.  We’re hoping not to lose power again so I’m rushing to get this blog published just in case.  I will try to keep my “dark depressions and irrational outbursts of anger” to a minimum.

Paul Cezanne “Riverbank” Day 2

My routine of posting a new blog on a Wednesday following a Tuesday copiest session at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. was derailed by an ice storm which hit our area hard leaving behind a half inch of ice on top of snow with down trees, limbs, power lines and a host of other problems.  Our power was off for two days forcing me to flee to a warmer shelter and unable to do any work related to art or blog.  We’re just getting back to normal.  Like everyone else feeling the effects of this winter, I’m hoping for better days ahead.

Tuesday, February 4, was day two working with Paul Cezanne’s “Riverbank”.  As one can see from the photo, while it is barely beginning to hum, as my favorite museum guard often says, it is coming along nicely.

Nature was the foundation and inspiration for Cezanne’s art.  He painted with feeling and his own strong emotion.  He had a personal, independent perception of the world which was formed by studying the great masters but always aspiring towards the intense and artless vision of a child.  He searched for his own temperament.  Cezanne asserted that art must strive to be ‘equivalent’ to nature and painted with a series of marks, colors and tones on a canvas that was the realization of his sensations.  As I copy “Riverbank”, my task is to figure out how those marks were made and the meaning behind them.  I discover as I work that Cezanne observed every nuance of light and tone in nature and every time the light changed, he would interpret that light with a different color layered thinly one on top of the other in a very determined fashion.  Copying “Riverbank” requires close observation and much thought and study.

The Gallery has several new and exciting exhibitions.  Let it warm your days viewing beautiful works of art and if you visit on a Tuesday, don’t forget to stop by to see me in gallery #84.  It looks as if I’ll be there for a while before going on to my next copy.

New Exhibit at the Delaplaine

The Frederick County Art Association will open its Member Exhibit with a reception this Saturday, January 4th from 3 to 5 pm at the Delaplaine Visual Arts Center, 40 S. Carroll Street in Frederick, Maryland.  I have entered two works into the exhibit, “Young Dancer” and “Bridge at Argenteuil” after Monet.  I hope to see many of my friends and family at the reception.  It is also First Saturday in downtown Frederick which offers many activities to be enjoyed all over town, not to mention great restaurants and shopping.  So bundle up, come out and enjoy the town as well as great art during the opening of several new exhibits at the Delaplaine.

Young Dancer
Young Dancer
The Bridge at Argenteuil after Claude Monet
The Bridge at Argenteuil after Claude Monet

On Tuesday, January 7th I will be putting the finishing touches on my copy of Vincent van Gogh “Roses” at the National Gallery of Art.  I’m also very excited to see for the first time the NGA’s newest acquisition of van Gogh’s painting “Green Wheat Fields, Auvers,” which has not been seen publicly since 1966 and was painted months before the artist’s death in 1890.  It hangs right next to “Roses” in gallery #83 so I will be able to admire it all day long.

On Tuesday, January 21st I will begin work on Paul Cezanne’s “Landscape near Paris” in the Impressionist gallery.  This masterpiece is a bit different from the ones I’ve previously copied.  It is a very loose oil painting done in thin washes almost like a watercolor. It will be a new challenge for me.  I will keep you posted on the progress.

Holiday Ornaments

It seems as if the holidays began in October.  I’m not the only one thinking this way;  others have expressed the same feeling.  This past Tuesday it felt strange not to be at the National Gallery of Art working on my copy of Vincent van Gogh’s “Roses.”  It was grandparents day at our granddaughter Caroline’s school, a yearly event we attend with joy and pride.  I’ll be back at the NGA next Tuesday and expect to be closer to completion of my copy.

This year I decided to create holiday ornaments depicting scenes of Frederick, Maryland.  Each ornament is hand painted in acrylic and shows a popular landmark around downtown.  The scenes are painted on glass ornaments from photographs I’ve taken and been collecting throughout the years.  Someone asked me to do a portrait of their home on an ornament so I thought painting Frederick scenes would be a fun project.  I’m going to try to paint a small facial portrait on one.  That will be a challenge!  Although, last year for a class assignment, our teacher asked us to paint a portrait the size of a quarter.  I didn’t think it was possible but I managed to pull it off. We’ll see what happens.

The Frederick ornaments may be seen in the gift shop of The Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center, 40 South Carroll St., Frederick, MD (301)698-0656.

I wish all of my friends, family and followers a very happy and safe Thanksgiving.

Vincent van Gogh Roses in Pink

Painting at the NGAMany may not realize that Vincent van Gogh created several versions of “Roses”.   The masterpiece created by VanGogh, “Roses” that is in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. was painted in 1890, shortly before he was released from the asylum at Saint-Remy.  It is among his largest and most beautiful still lifes, with an exuberant bouquet in the glory of full bloom.

Originally, the roses were pink which would have made a beautiful compliment with the green background.  However, the pink has faded throughout the years.  It is difficult to determine which roses and how many were originally pink. I am in the process of copying this piece for the second time.  The first time I copied it just as the it looks today.  For the second try, after doing some research, I took the liberty of painting it in the manner that I believe van Gogh created the original–with the pink roses.  After careful observation, I decided that the flowers that have the slightest tinge of pink were probably the ones that he painted in pink. It’s been fun to see how this painting has evolved and how it will end up.  It should be completed in about one more session.

One can view the original creation as well as my copy on Tuesdays from 10:30 AM until about 4:00 PM in the Impressionist Gallery #83.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

MET - NYC full view
Copying Renoir “Still Life with Peaches”

I’ve put another check mark on my bucket list.  As a high school student living in New York City, I often took trips to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. As I walked through the great galleries, the feelings I experienced were multiple.  It was almost unrealistic that someone could actually paint such magnificent works of art.  I remember being entranced, walking around in a state of awe, not quite understanding what I was feeling, but happy to be there soaking in such beauty and color while observing the unbelievable skills of the master artists.

During the time period of July 8 through July 19, 2013, I realized a dream I thought could never happen. I became a Copyist at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  I was doing what I loved in my own home town –  the beloved city of New York.  After a long application process I was accepted in the program, one of five copyists selected for the summer season.  I copied Auguste Renior’s “Still Life with Peaches.” It was an unbelievable experience to be so close to that magnificent painting.  I met art lovers from all over the world, exchanged stories, answered many questions while loving everyday and every moment.  The museum staff was wonderful and helpful.  The copy drew tremendous interest and many positive comments from the patrons.

A special thanks to my dear friends Camille and Joe who opened their city apartment to me.  It is conveniently located and enabled me to travel daily to the MET with a load of art supplies.  Without their generosity and support, this experience may have never happened.

Renoir and I visit Le Pont Neuf in Paris

On May 21, I began work on “Pont Neuf, Paris” by Auguste Renoir.  This may be the most challenging of my work at the NGA.  The enormity of the details, particularly the many windows in a city architectural scene, can be a tedious task as I’m sure it must have been for Renoir.  Most apparent here and the focal point of this painting is Renoir’s transcription of the effects of sunlight.  The midday sun suffuses the panorama, its intensity heightening the artist’s palette and suppressing incidental detail to clarify the crowded scene. Renoir pre-sketched the architecture before setting out to paint the remainder of the scene. I began my copy in the same manner.

Edmond Renoir, the artist’s younger brother and a novice journalist in 1872, later told how Renoir secured an owner’s permission to occupy an upper floor of a cafe for one day to depict the view of the famous bridge.  Edmond periodically delayed passersby long enough for the artist to record their appearance in the painting.  Renoir even noted Edmond’s presence in two locations, walking stick in hand and straw hat on his head.  Renoir wanted to show the energetic crowd walking across the sun-drenched pavement and going about their daily routine on this clear sunny day. He depicted vendors pushing carts carrying goods across the bridge, children at play, dogs chasing children, and the hustle and bustle of daily life. Does it make you wonder what is on the other side of the bridge?

I am at the NGA, Washington D.C. every Tuesday, (gallery 89 until the completion of this painting).  Stop by and say hello.

Master Copies from The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

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The images in this gallery are authentic copies from the masters at The National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.  Each piece is authenticated by the NGA as a copy from the original and painted in oil.  Most are on a linen surface. Some are on gallery stretchers and do not require framing as they are painted around the sides of the canvas.  Careful research and study was done to learn the process and use of color during the time period the original painting was created.  These one-of-a-kind works of art are available for sale.  Interested parties should contact me here.

I am also taking commissions to copy any master painting at the NGA that is available to me for copying. Visit the National Gallery of Art’s collection at www.nga.gov.

The Dancer – Auguste Renior

The Dancer after Renoir, in copyThe Dancer by Auguste Renior, is the largest copy I have attempted (30″x40″), the maximum size allowed by the NGA for a copy. The original measures 56 1/8″X 45 3/4″. All copies I have completed thus far presented a challenge but because of the size of The Dancer this one is even more complex. “The Dancer was one of seven works Renoir included in an exhibition in Paris which opened in April 1874 with a group of artists soon to be known as the impressionists. The Dancer inevitably calls to mind the work of Renoir’s fellow impressionist Edgar Degas, whose name is now synonymous with depictions of ballet dancers. The paintings scale and the figure’s prominence by being placed in the very center of the composition, dominate the entire canvas. Shown in profile, her silk-slippered feet placed in classic fifth position, Renoir’s dancer is poised and alert as she turns her gaze toward the viewer. Renoir accentuated the dancer’s youth and he masterfully captured the gauzy softness of the tulle which floats about her body like a cloud seeming to dissolve into the hazy background. The fabric as light and ethereal as mist. This painting, as did Degas’ “The Dance Lesson”, reminds me of my youth when I painfully endured ballet lessons and wanted so badly to learn to dance well and become a ballerina. It didn’t happen but I enjoyed it and now have had the thrill of producing a dancer on canvas.

The color in the digital photograph of the copy when compared to the original work appears to be different but when actually viewed in person they are as close as can be achieved taking into consideration that the original is over one hundred years older than the copy and the color has faded.